ALBUM REVIEW: EAST INDIA YOUTH

eastindia
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OF VOLUME
RELEASED: 6TH APRIL 2015, XL RECORDINGS

Theatrical electronic orchestration meets crisp vocal melodies for William Doyle AKA East India Youth’s stunning sophomore album ‘Culture Of Youth’. The first album of Doyle’s to be released through XL recordings is said to be influenced by Brian Eno, Pet Shop Boys and David Bowie among others with the title based on the poem ‘Monument’ by Eno collaborator Rick Holland. Opening on a heavily textured four minute wall of sound, ‘Culture Of Volume’ manages to instantly distinguish itself from the crowd, second track ‘End Result’ gradually builds from playful melodies to a dramtic angst ridden climax.

The album is constructed around a spectrum of styles from glistening synth ambience to the chiptune style electronic melodies frantically rush through ‘Hearts That Never’. Early Prodigy style elecrtonica dominates the first half of ‘Entirety’ fading into a heavy drumbeat then building again to a scorching techno styled finale before ‘Don’t Look Back’ sweeps in with an outstanding amalgamation of icy chill out and floaty vocals. The record closes with a shimmering display of experimental electronics, securing the fact that as far as difficult second albums go this certainly isn’t one of them.


‘Culture Of Youth’ is out now